The taboo of Childhood sexual abuse with Dr. Rosenna Bakari 

Childhood sexual abuse makes its way into the “Me Too” movement with Rosenna Bakari’s remarkable story 

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colorado – A new voice is entering the national discussion to make sure that adult survivors of childhood sexual abuse can be heard. Dr. Rosenna Bakari is launching her remarkable memoir about living in silence along with a new We2 mission to bring survivors and listeners together. Activist, educator and poet Rosenna Bakari shares her personal experience with incest, growing up in a home in Philadelphia where family members abused her as a child and how she is now empowering fellow survivors to live openly and heal. 

In “Too Much Love Is Not Enough: A Memoir of Silence of Childhood Sexual Abuse”, Bakari writes with pure honesty, sensitivity and, last but not least, inspiring strength. She hides nothing from her readers -- the good, the bad and the ugly. Her effort to love when there is much reason to hate is truly remarkable. The memoir, which marks Bakari’s fourth book, gives an intimate glimpse into what it’s like to live as an adult survivor of childhood sexual abuse and why she decided to break her silence. 

“We were never supposed to talk about this, so we didn’t know how,” she says. 

Bakari founded a nonprofit organization, Talking Trees, in 2010 as the first of its kind to encourage survivors of childhood sexual abuse and incest to live openly. The organization began as an online community and has since evolved to include an annual conference for members across the United States. 

Rosenna Bakari earned her Ph.D. in educational psychology from the University of Northern Colorado in 2000, several years after receiving her M.S. in counseling from the State University of New York. She earned her B.S. in psychology from Cornell University in 1984. Her professional career includes drug and alcohol counseling, psychiatric technician, college campus therapist, and teaching at community and four-year colleges. Bakari is currently the executive director of Talking Trees, Inc., a nonprofit empowerment organization for adult survivors of childhood sexual abuse. As the founder, she has grown the organization to over 5,500 international followers that gather online daily to read her updated post for discussion. In addition to creating online resources to support survivors, Talking Trees, Inc. holds a National Safe Space Day Conference every April 15 to celebrate the resilience of survivors. Talking Trees, Inc. is the first organization to encourage and support survivors living openly to heal. Her newest book “Too Much Love Is Not Enough: A Memoir of Silence of Childhood Sexual Abuse” releases on April 12, 2018. 

About the Book 

“Too Much Love Is Not Enough: A Memoir of Silence About Childhood Sexual Abuse” 

Rosenna Bakari 

Preview Too Much Love Is Not Enough: 
https://dl.bookfunnel.com/kdi165clo8 

Author Pages: 
https://www.amazon.com/Rosenna-Bakari/e/B001K8WEW8 
https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/6312399.Rosenna_Bakari 

Media Coverage: 
https://twelveminuteconvos.com/rosenna-bakari/ 
https://www.csbj.com/2017/11/09/women-influence-dr-rosenna-bakari/ 
https://www.facebook.com/157082910999500/videos/1087948447912937/ 
http://whotv.com/2016/04/15/dmacc-hosts-safe-space-on-all-metro-campuses/ 
https://rescuinglittlel.wordpress.com/tag/dr-rosenna-bakari/ 

Websites: 
https://rosennabakari.com 
https://talkingtreessurvivors.com 

Social Media: 
https://www.facebook.com/1roguescholar 
https://twitter.com/RosennaBakari 
https://www.instagram.com/rosennabakari/ 
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC3VK5QbAMBOxwDKconWfoGg 
https://www.linkedin.com/in/rosenna-bakari-jackson-b3120194/

Memoir | Biography 

Rosenna Bakari’s memoir is a UV light that reveals the blood stain of silence - presenting irrefutable evidence that harm has been done in spite of the squeaky-clean surface. Rosenna’s effort to live as if the abuse never happened supported her approach to personal and professional trials, seeing them as obstacles to be overcome, rather than permanent barriers. However, all of the systems upon which she relied deepened her pain. To her dismay, achievements of marriage, financial stability and earning her Ph.D. continuously bumped up against her childhood trauma as she hid thoughts of suicide and accumulating health concerns. She weaved through bitterness and anger in a world that seemed hell-bent on breaking the spirit and believes others can too because trauma should not have the final word.

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